Blog by Robert Zurflu (Registered Dietitian)
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Robert Zurfluh
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PostPosted: Mon, Aug 17 2009, 9:12 pm EDT    Post subject: Blog by Robert Zurflu (Registered Dietitian) Reply with quote

Working as a registered dietitian, I thought I'd share some of my interests/thoughts with everyone via a blog.

http://cranburydietitian.tumblr.com

I just started the blog last month, but I'd be happy to address anybody's nutrition-related questions (maybe I can include a question of the month).
My main interests are in weight management, wellness, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Recently I have been venturing into sports nutrition a little bit more. For more info and/or questions, please feel free to contact me.

(robertzurfluhrd@gmail.com)


Thank you,

-Robert
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PostPosted: Mon, Aug 17 2009, 9:13 pm EDT    Post subject: Re: Blog by Robert Zurflu (Registered Dietitian) Reply with quote

Thanks - this is great information!

I have a question - would you please explain the difference between high and low glycemic index foods? Are there high glycemic index foods that are good for you?
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Robert Zurflu
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PostPosted: Mon, Aug 17 2009, 9:14 pm EDT    Post subject: Re: Blog by Robert Zurflu (Registered Dietitian) Reply with quote

Guest wrote:
Thanks - this is great information!

I have a question - would you please explain the difference between high and low glycemic index foods? Are there high glycemic index foods that are good for you?


Thanks "Guest". The application of the glycemic index is still very controversial. It's an index of how fast your blood sugar will rise when you consume 50g of carbohydrates. This works well for high carbohydrate foods like bread, potatoes, rice, and sweets.

The problem comes in when you look at fruits, vegetables, prepared, and high fat foods. Carrots for example have a high GI (80), but it is unlikely that you would eat 50g of carbohydrates from carrots at a given time (approx 5-6 medium sized carrots). Ice cream has a low GI (mid-30's), but I would not necessarily consider it a food to eat on a daily basis.

The glycemic load is probably a better measure, since it takes portion size into account. However, it is very difficult to practically track glycemic index/load in everyday life since so many foods are mixed together, and our meals usually don't consist of one particular food. Honey is a high GI food, peanuts are not. What is the index/load when I eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich? On whole grain / or on white bread? Another issue is accuracy of the tests used to determine the GI. Peanuts for example have 2 values for the GI...13 and 23.

Depending on the situation, let's say for diabetes management, it may be better to use diabetic exchanges / carbohydrate counting, meal planning, and weight reduction.

A diet that consists predominantly of fresh products will have a lower GI. Eating high fiber foods with meals will slow down a rise in blood sugar, effectively changing the GI.

I hope that answers your question.

Thanks.
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a mid-aged Guy
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PostPosted: Mon, Aug 17 2009, 9:25 pm EDT    Post subject: Re: Blog by Robert Zurflu (Registered Dietitian) Reply with quote

Quote:
...
On the surface the answer as to why we are getting bigger (and unhealthier) is very easy. We eat too much and we donít move enough. However, to get a better picture, we need to look at reasons why we eat too much, and why we donít move as much as we should.
...


http://cranburydietitian.tumblr.com/

The info posted there is quite good. I agree with most of it.

As I becomes older, my belly becomes bigger. Neutral
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Robert Zurfluh
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PostPosted: Sat, Sep 26 2009, 11:48 am EDT    Post subject: Re: Blog by Robert Zurfluh (Registered Dietitian) Reply with quote

a mid-aged Guy wrote:
Quote:
...
On the surface the answer as to why we are getting bigger (and unhealthier) is very easy. We eat too much and we donít move enough. However, to get a better picture, we need to look at reasons why we eat too much, and why we donít move as much as we should.
...


http://cranburydietitian.tumblr.com/

The info posted there is quite good. I agree with most of it.

As I becomes older, my belly becomes bigger. Neutral


Thanks "mid-aged guy".
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